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Issue 4: London

Discover a locally curated guide to the city's finest experiences

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  • A fountain at Regent's Park. Photograph by Thomas Bowles
  • St. Paul's at night. Photograph by Thomas Bowles
    St. Paul's at night. Photograph by Thomas Bowles

    Issue 4: London

    London has been home to a cathedral dedicated to St. Paul for more than 1,400 years. Here is its fourth incarnation, designed by Sir Christopher Wren and built in the late 17th century. Though it is technically a Christian church, replete with services, the cathedral is a huge attraction for any lover of architecture or design. From the crypt (where the Duke of Wellington is buried) to the gorgeous nave and quire sections of the cathedral, it is something to see. Its dome is over 100 meters tall (one of the largest in the world), weighing 65,000 tons, and famously withstood the blitz in World War II. As you wander, don’t forget to look up; some of the most stunning sights are high above you.

  • Daunt Books, Marylebone. Photograph by Thomas Bowles
    Daunt Books, Marylebone. Photograph by Thomas Bowles

    Issue 4: London

    The most charming outpost of this London mini-chain is also its original—the first portion of the Marylebone shop opened in 1912. With its pleasant skylights, incredible selection—the travel section in particular is renowned nationwide, if not worldwide—and general panache, Daunt is worth swinging by even if you’re not in the neighborhood. (This is a literary town, after all!)

  • Photograph by Thomas Bowles
    Photograph by Thomas Bowles

    Issue 4: London

    One of the best ways to get to truly know a city is to visits its outdoor markets, and Borough Market is among the best in Europe. Dating back to the 13th century, the market today encompasses more than 100 vendors. It is a quick jaunt across London Bridge, and these days its pleasures are more diverse than just bread and cheese, eggs and apples: look for 13 different wine, coffee and tea vendors, and more than a dozen bars and restaurants (we adore the Rake, a craft beer bar.)

  • Liberty London. Photograph by Thomas Bowles
  • Photograph by Thomas Bowles
    Photograph by Thomas Bowles

    Issue 4: London

    Did you know Buckingham Palace was once simply called Buckingham House? George III bought it in 1761 for his wife, Queen Charlotte, to use as a family home. By the mid-1800s it had been transformed into a proper palace, which Queen Victoria moved into in 1837. Since then it has both housed the royal family and been their administrative headquarters. Don’t miss the famous changing of the Queen’s Guard, which starts at 11:30am daily from April to July (every other day the rest of the year), and is still something to see.