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Issue 3: Charleston

Discover a locally curated guide to the city's finest experiences

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    • Issue 3: Charleston

      You can and should walk, bicycle and drive your way around Charleston, but there’s nothing more classic than a horse-and-buggy tour through the heart of the Historic District. (We like Old South Carriage Tours, which has been run by the same local family since 1983, but it’s hard to go wrong with any of these pretty carriages). Loop around majestic White Point Garden, seen here, and admire the stately old mansions lining the streets.

      • Sean Brock, right, chef at Husk Restaurant and McCrady's, preparing food for the festival.
        Sean Brock, right, chef at Husk Restaurant and McCrady's, preparing food for the festival.
        Photograph by Andrew Cebulka
      • Attendees of the Charleston Wine and Food Festival.
        Attendees of the Charleston Wine and Food Festival.
        Photograph by Andrew Cebulka
      • Food being prepared for the festival.
        Food being prepared for the festival.
        Photograph by Andrew Cebulka

        Issue 3: Charleston

        Just as Charleston has made a name for itself as a dining destination, so, too, has the town’s Wine and Food Festival garnered national acclaim. Eat ribs at casual outdoor barbecues, take cooking classes, or get gussied up for fancy evening cocktail parties. This is one of America’s best events for sampling modern cuisine—often including local seafood, meat and vegetables.  The extravaganza isn’t reserved solely for Southerners, either; renowned chefs like Sean Brock of Husk cook multi-course meals right alongside chefs from California and Australia. It’s an event worth centering a trip around.

      • Photograph by Andrew Cebulka

        Issue 3: Charleston

        As is true of New Orleans, Charleston is a music town, so definitely catch some live jazz before you depart. If you’re staying at the Charleston Place Hotel, all the better, as you’ll have easy access to the world-class jazz performed seven nights a week downstairs at the Charleston Grill. We like to kick back with a Pimm’s Cup and people-watch; it’s a popular local stopoff. (Staying elsewhere? No matter—you can make a reservation at the Grill, too.)

      • Shoppers at Charleston City Market.
        Shoppers at Charleston City Market.
        Photograph by Andrew Cebulka

        Issue 3: Charleston

        Historic Charleston City Market was built on land ceded to the city by Revolutionary War veteran Charles Cotesworth Pinckney in 1788—with a stipulation that it be used solely as a public market in perpetuity. Today the stunning brick market houses small, unique shops selling locally made goods like sweetgrass baskets, artwork, jewelry, woven baskets, fruits and vegetables.

      • Photograph by Andrew Cebulka

        Issue 3: Charleston

        A ferry trip to Fort Sumter is a two-for-one adventure: The ride itself is beautiful, with stellar views of the Charleston Harbor, and the fort—the famous starting point for the Civil War, when Major Robert Anderson refused to surrender the fort to Confederate troops—is fascinating. Look for the five historic replicas of flags flying over the fort that don’t have 50 stars. This is a great place to take kids.

      • Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge.
        Photograph by Andrew Cebulka